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Women drinking out in Britain since the early twentieth century$
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David W. Gutzke

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780719052644

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719052644.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Women drinking out in Britain since the early twentieth century
Author(s):

David W. Gutzke

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719052644.003.0001

Diverse forces shaped women’s drinking habits: wars; Progressivism; changes in demography, the economy and work; enduring sexism not just among pub and beerhouse patrons but throughout the industry; moral panics; pubcos; different generational attitudes; ambitious entrepreneurs unconnected with the brewing industry; and alterations in the drinking culture itself, from layouts and beverages to licensing hours and escalating numbers of youth drinkers. Women’s drinking habits changed most in the interwar era and the years 1975-2000. Scholars have overlooked distinctions between pubs and beerhouses, the introduction of the lounge and public opinion or marketing surveys, contributing to much misunderstanding of how, why and where women drank. I used wide-ranging sources: periodicals focusing on drinking, the national press, architectural journals, corporate archives, oral histories, parliamentary papers, advertisements, Mass-Observation reports and sociological studies. Throughout the book I engage with scholarly arguments of women’s drinking behaviour, and offer original interpretations.

Keywords:   Drinking habits, Progressivism, Interdisciplinary approach, Historiography, Lounge, Public opinion polls, Oral histories, Beerhouses, Environmental psychology

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